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Commercial Airline Accidents Archives

Safety improvements in aviation industry driven by lessons learned in accidents, mishaps, P.2

Previously, we began looking at an article discussing some of the important changes in the aviation industry and how they came about. As we noted, many of the beneficial changes in the use of materials, design, manufacturing, features, inspections and maintenance, came about because of lessons learned from aviation accidents.

Safety improvements in aviation industry driven by lessons learned in accidents, mishaps, P.1

A recent article in popular mechanics highlights an important point about the state of modern aviation: it was often the lessons learned from high profile airplane crashes that prompted manufacturers and regulators to make change that improved aviation safety. The accumulation of these changes is what has made aviation a safer way to travel.

Pursuing a claim under the FTCA for military aviation accident injuries

In our last post, we noted that there are significant limitations on active duty military members’ ability to seek compensation from the federal government for losses in aviation accidents. Active duty service members may not be able to file lawsuits for damages in many circumstances, but they should work with an experienced aviation law attorney to understand when they may have the right to sue.

Are government accident reports admissible as evidence at trial? P.3

We’ve been looking in recent posts at the admissibility of government accident reports as evidence in court. This is an important issue not only in aviation accidents involving personal injury and wrongful death claims, but also in those involving product liability claims. In aviation accident litigation involving any of these types of claims, the information contained in a government accident report can be potentially valuable for plaintiffs.

Are government accident reports admissible as evidence at trial? P.2

In our previous post, we began looking at the potential usefulness of government accident reports for victims of airline crashes. These reports can sometimes be used to the benefit of crash victims, but there are certain issues that have to be taken into consideration with respect to the admissibility of these reports into evidence at trial.

Are government accident reports admissible as evidence at trial?

For victims of aviation accidents, whether injured passengers or surviving family members, building a strong personal injury, wrongful death or product liability case requires solid evidence of liability, whether on the part of the airline, airplane manufacturers, suppliers, maintenance contractors or any other party that contributed to the crash.  

Black box recorders a useful source of evidence in commercial airline accidents

Building a solid aviation accident case, like any accident case, is dependent on the available evidence regarding the crash. Obtaining evidence typically involves examining the wreckage, interviewing any survivors who were involved in the crash, as well as eyewitnesses to the accident and others who have knowledge of the flight.

NTSB investigators among critics of Clint Eastwood film, Sully

New York readers remember that, in 2009, a US Airways airplane made an emergency landing in the Hudson River with 155 passengers aboard. Remarkably, the accident resulted in no deaths, and only minor injuries for a small group of passengers. One of the reasons the landing was so successful is that the pilot was so skillful in executing the emergency landing.

NTSB aircraft accident investigations, their relationship to accident litigation, P.2

Last time, we began looking at some features of the process the National Transportation Safety Board uses when investigating aircraft accidents. As we noted, the specific manner in which aircraft accidents are investigated depends on the nature of the accident. Whatever avenue is taken for investigation, though, any findings made in the process do not determine legal liability and cannot be used as evidence in court.

Work with experienced attorney to recover damages from airline security breaches

In our last post, we began looking at new U.S. security rules prohibiting airline passengers from bringing large electronic devices in their carry-on baggage. As we noted, the rules are largely aimed at addressing the threat of terrorism. Airlines, of course, have the duty to put into place security measures which comply with all federal safety regulations and which are effective at addressing threats.

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